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Surrealist
Surrealist Tarot
Diary
Diary of a Broken Soul
     
bifrost
bifrost Tarot
Langustl
Langustl Tarot
Rider-Waite
Rider-Waite

 

 

The Magician is the quintessential tarot card. When we look at the different versions on Tarotsmith, we can see various aspects of the icon of the tarot deck. With the exception of Soulscapes which captures the image of focused energy, every version of the Magician shows somebody using a set of 4 tools that represent 4 different elemental states, which are also suits in the tarot deck. The elements of fire, water, air, and earth respectively correspond to the suits of wands, cups, swords, and disks.

 

For this card we immediately notice that Langustl is closely focused on the act of focusing itself. As usual Langustl does not show the figure, placing you in the position, first person perspective rather than third. 

 


 

Surrealist revisions this card as the Sorcerer, but the image, in this case of a weird 4-armed creature, is easily recognizable. Diary’s version looks very similar. The Rider-Waite and bifrost versions also look very close once again. In each of these variations we see the focused character performing some kind of magic act. In the old days of tarot before occult influence, this kind of magician would be performing magic tricks for a royal audience. Occult decks view this character more as an occult magician, using ritual magic to achieve results.

 

The Diary and bifrost versions provide insight about how this archetype gets the job done. In Diary of a Broken Soul, the Magician sacrifices of his own life force, knowing his own blood to be the most potent offering. In bifrost the Magus is like an occult sage whose will effects the actions of others. He stands on the mountain mid-ritual, the act of sending out the force of his willpower. He symbolically manipulates the lemniscate, making his rainbow split in 7 directions.