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Surrealist
Surrealist Tarot
Diary
Diary of a Broken Soul
     
bifrost
bifrost Tarot
Langustl
Langustl Tarot
Rider-Waite
Rider-Waite

 

 

Arguably the most notorious card of the tarot deck is the Death card, which is also one of the most polarizing. The Rider version of this card is a classic, picturing the biblical horseman of Death. The king has fallen and only the Pope has the courage to face him. Others have been brought to their knees, and the sun is setting between the towers. Death may be a frightening concept, but Tarotsmith is proud that each deck’s artist had the courage to face Death, not changing this card’s name.

 

One rendition of the Death card sticks out like a sore thumb. Langustl’s image of Death is about as menacing as the Grateful Dead’s loudest song. By the same token that makes black the most popular color to wear to a funeral, bright colors are not commonly used on the tarot’s Death card. Strike one on the fashion faux pas by Langustl.

 


 

The most disturbing Death may be a toss up, depending on the individual. Certainly the most brutal Death belongs to Diary. A scene of the Grim Reaper masterminding a mob action murder is extreme symbolism for a tarot deck. Surrealist also bears a rather disturbing image on the Death card. It’s odd how something as basic as the color inversion of a creepy looking child’s face can be so psychologically unsettling.

 

Probably the most recognizable symbol in any deck, bifrost uses the classic poison symbol of the skull and bones, like you would see representing a pirate ship in the movies. The skull and bones are complimented by 7 spirits, as the number 7 represents many things in this deck.